Environmental & Regulatory Compliance Features for November 2009

Environmental & Regulatory Compliance Features Archive

Compliance Requirements of New EPA Regulations on Area Sources in the Plating and Polishing Industry Compliance Requirements of New EPA Regulations on Area Sources in the Plating and Polishing Industry

The U.S. EPA has developed new requirements to reduce air pollution from plating and polishing facilities. Shaikh Tayeb and Tapan Das, from the Delaware Dept. of Natural Resources & Environmental Control, discuss the new compliance and reporting requirements, in addition to providing suggestions on how to cost-effectively minimize your facility's emissions. Links and downloads to helpful compliance documents are also provided.

The Clean Energy Race: Pew Center Sees Greenhouse Gas Regulation As All But Inevitable The Clean Energy Race: Pew Center Sees Greenhouse Gas Regulation As All But Inevitable

Drew Amorosi, managing editor of Metal Finishing, recently caught up with Dr. Manik Roy and Dr. Janet Peace of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change to discuss the climate change legislation making its way through Congress. One fact is clear from the conversation: Whether it’s via Congress, the states, or the EPA, the regulation of greenhouse gasses is very much on the horizon here in the United States, if not already upon us. The question for the business and manufacturing community is by which method and from what source will regulation emerge, and what system will be the least harmful to business conditions?

National VOC Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings National VOC Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings

In June of 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established national reactivity-based emission standards for 170 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) used in aerosol coating products. This aerosol coatings reactivity rule aims to encourage reformulation of aerosol coatings to reduce ground-level ozone formation. The rule specifies reactivity limits for 36 aerosol product categories. The 170 VOCs are ranked by their reactivity factor (RF, units in grams of ozone per gram of VOC). VOCs with a high RF are more likely to form ozone, an air pollutant, than VOCs with a lower RF.